My Life as a Dog

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My 7-year-old son believes in reincarnation, so I asked him what he would like to come back as in his next life.

“Probably a dog,”  he said nonchalantly. “Or Santa Claus.”

After a bit of contemplation, I realized how wise this response was. We often think that humans are at the top of the reincarnation ladder, but this isn’t necessarily true. Dog is God spelled backwards.

“If you can remain perfectly calm in traffic…

If you see others succeed without a tinge of jealousy,

If you can love everyone around you unconditionally,

If you can always be cheerful just where you are,

You are probably…

A Dog!”

I’m starting to think that dogs are far more enlightened than even high-vibration spiritual masters. Our two Shi Tzus are definitely the two most compassionate and equanimous members of our household.

When my sons are crying, both my dogs will start to moan and howl in unison with the cries. When I had a tumor, Skye and Jax would come lie on my belly when I was sleeping. They could sense my pain and would just be with me.

These dogs spend most of their day sitting in silence. One could argue that they meditate over 5 hours a day. They always welcome me with open paws when I return after a long day and never seem to hold any grudges, even when I forget to feed them.

I think my son was intuitively sensing into a higher consciousness. Even his answer about Santa Claus can be seen as refined.

Santa Clause spreads joy and gives generously without any expectation of getting anything in return. If he was a Buddhist, he would be what we call a Bodhisattva—a being that compassionately refrains from enlightenment in order to save others. Was my son saying that he wants to come back as a Bodhisattva?

A dog or a Bodhisattva, those are two noble intentions. Amazing how simple and wise young children can be.

What would you come back as in your next life if you had the opportunity?

 

 

 

 

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God Is In Your Poop and Pee

A Six Year Old’s Views on God

While I was driving, my son started talking about how God killed the dinosaurs, so I pulled over and recorded his lecture.

I love the open-mindedness and insight in lines like “God is everywhere, even in your poop and peep” or “God is like a copy, but God’s special.”

Thank you for watching, smiling, and/or sharing.

Do you remember your first thoughts about God? Please share.

A Peaceful Path through Music

Music carved a peaceful path in my tumultuous history like a lifeline that saved me from the abyss

Sarah McLachlan’s “Angel” marks a 15 year journey to find peace through music, film, and poetry. I’ve always had a soft spot for Irish female singers–I know McLachlan is Canadian, but I envision her as Irish descent. In 1984, trying to recover from 12 years of physical abuse, I clung to the lyrics of This Mortal Coil‘s “Song of the Siren.”

“Did I dream you dreamed about me?” offered me an escape from reality in the arms of some nurturing goddess. Continue reading

Kokua–“Hawaiian Medicine is not for sale”

IMG_0499While visiting a friend’s coffee plantation on the Big Island of Hawaii, my step-father told the story of how he used to pick coffee beans in Kona when he was a kid. When someone asked how much he got paid, he simply said, “kokua.” Kokua is the Hawaiian tradition of “extending loving, sacrificial help to others for their benefit, not for personal gain.”Pololu Valley

Later, on the plane ride home, I watched a documentary about the Hawaiian rainforests. A Hawaiian medicine man mentioned how he would only gather enough medicinal plants for the sick person. “Hawaiian medicine is not for sale,” he scolded.

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I took this as a sign for my business, so for the next 30 days, I am offering 30 free half-hour telephone or video conference sessions.

Simply click on the link below to schedule. No strings attached. I specialize in bringing peace to relationships, but I offer services and practices that will bring peace to any stressed-out, disconnected, or overwhelmed individuals.

Feel free to forward this link to any friends or family that need a refuge from the modern mindless, achievement-based rat race.

Click here to schedule a free 30 minute phone/video conference session

Is there a practice of selfless service in your culture? Please share.

Dear Darkness, You Light Up My Life

I tweeted this a few weeks ago and got a few favorites and retweets.

As someone whose been through his fair share of chaos, I can honestly say that I am grateful for all the dark puzzle pieces in my life.

I’ve learned that darkness brings out the light. Those of you who are artists, photographers, or filmmakers know that nothing highLIGHTS more than contrast. If we look at the dark parts of a piece of art, we quickly realize that these dark spots allow us to see the Light. Continue reading

What I Love About You

Hey you! Yes, you. I love you. You who read this blog, add comments, or smile and spread joy.

I feel blessed that this small space in the internet has become a gathering place for generous, peaceful, wise, and empathic souls like you.

Case in point, one of my dear friends, Geo Sans, posted a comment on a recent post that included a video. This video made me smile, laugh, cry, and appreciate everything there is in life–including you.

I didn’t want the video to get lost in comments, so I’ve made a special post for it. Zach Sobiech defines Everyday Guru. His short life was spent loving and serving. He is an inspiration to everyone he touched, and thanks to the power of the internet, he touched a lot of people. According to Geo Sans, Zach passed away May 20th. Rest in Peace, Zach. You are loved and appreciated.

Enjoy. Love. Smile.

Celebrity version of Zach’s song, “Clouds.”

May you be free from suffering. May you find peace and joy.

Love, Reign O’er Me

Looking back at my childhood, I realize that it wasn’t the 10 years of physical abuse by my step-father that hurt the most; it was watching my mother stand idly by as I screamed for mercy. Don’t get me wrong, I love my mom. That was part of the problem.

Until recently, my whole life has been a desperate attempt to become loveable. As an Asian American growing up in the 80s, I loved this country. Yet my love was often rejected with angry chants of “go back to where you came from.”

Continue reading